Difference between revisions of "Elysium quadrangle"

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This quadrangle was named after Elysium, a place of reward (Heaven), according to Homer in the Odyssey.<ref>Blunck, J.  1982.  Mars and its Satellites.  Exposition Press.  Smithtown, N.Y.</ref>
The Elysium quadrangle covers the area between 180° to 225° west longitude and 0° to 30° north latitude on Mars. A small part of the [[Medusae Fossae Formation]] lies in this quadrangle.  Eddie, Lockyer, and Tombaugh are the largest craters in the Elysium quadrangle. Elysium Mons and Albor Tholus are large volcanoes in this quadrangle.  Just outside the boundaries of Elysium quadrangle sits another large volcano called Hecates.  There are possible  giant river valleys in this area.  Athabasca Valles  may be one of the youngest on the planet. A large lake may once have existed in the south near Lethe Valles and Athabasca Valles.<ref>"Cabrol, N 2010">Cabrol, N. and E. Grin (eds.).  2010.  Lakes on Mars.  Elsevier.  NY.</ref>
The [[InSight]] lander touched down in the southern part of this quadrangle in 2018 and is now gathering data especially on Marsquakes.
[[Category:  Mars Atlas]]
[[Category:  Mars Atlas]]

Revision as of 07:22, 28 February 2020

Mars topography (MOLA dataset) HiRes (1).jpg
MC-15 Elysium 0–30° N 135–180° E Quadrangles Atlas

This quadrangle was named after Elysium, a place of reward (Heaven), according to Homer in the Odyssey.[1]

The Elysium quadrangle covers the area between 180° to 225° west longitude and 0° to 30° north latitude on Mars. A small part of the Medusae Fossae Formation lies in this quadrangle. Eddie, Lockyer, and Tombaugh are the largest craters in the Elysium quadrangle. Elysium Mons and Albor Tholus are large volcanoes in this quadrangle. Just outside the boundaries of Elysium quadrangle sits another large volcano called Hecates. There are possible giant river valleys in this area. Athabasca Valles may be one of the youngest on the planet. A large lake may once have existed in the south near Lethe Valles and Athabasca Valles.[2]

The InSight lander touched down in the southern part of this quadrangle in 2018 and is now gathering data especially on Marsquakes.

  1. Blunck, J. 1982. Mars and its Satellites. Exposition Press. Smithtown, N.Y.
  2. "Cabrol, N 2010">Cabrol, N. and E. Grin (eds.). 2010. Lakes on Mars. Elsevier. NY.